The life of henry ii and his influence of the english exchequer

Henry invaded England inand King Stephen agreed to accept him as coadjutor and heir. Local gentry saw the office as one of local influence and prestige and were therefore willing to serve. Normandy, MaineAnjou, and Aquitaine were united to the English crown inand before twenty years had passed NantesQuercy, Brittany, and Toulouse had all practically fallen under English rule.

Henry II of England

Henry invaded England inand King Stephen agreed to accept him as coadjutor and heir. Eleanor bore Henry five sons and three daughters between and ; the relationship between Henry, Eleanor, and their sons Henry, Richard, and John proved to be tumultuous and treacherous.

The rebellion began in Irelandwhere the traditionally Yorkist nobility, headed by the powerful Gerald FitzGerald, 8th Earl of Kildareproclaimed Simnel King and provided troops for his invasion of England. As regards foreign policy Henry found himself possessed of dominions such as no English king before him had ever known.

With Louis the relationship was ambiguous.

Henry I (c.1069 - 1135)

All these writs gave rapid and clear verdicts subject to later revision. Henry VII centrewith his advisors Sir Richard Empson and Sir Edmund Dudley Henry had been under the financial and physical protection of the French throne or its vassals for most of his life, prior to his ascending the throne of England.

She was born into a powerful ruling class of Normanswho traditionally owned extensive estates in both England and Normandy, and her first husband had been the Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. A second rebellion flared up in with a quarrel between his sons Henry and Richard over the government of Aquitaine, but young Henry died in Of stocky build, with freckled face, close-cut tawny hair, and gray eyes, he dressed carelessly and grew to be bulky; but his personality commanded attention and drew men to his service.

Normandy, Maine, Anjou, and Aquitaine were united to the English crown inand before twenty years had passed Nantes, Quercy, Brittany, and Toulouse had all practically fallen under English rule.

There is but one voice amongst contemporaries to render homage to the strong and beneficial government carried on by Henry and his chancellor Thomas Becket during seven or eight years.

It is probable that Henry was influenced in his choice of a primate by the anticipation of conflicts with the Church.

No doubt he was already planning his attack on the jurisdiction of the Courts-Christian, and it is also probable enough that Thomas himself had divined it. But if his reign is to be judged by its consequences for England, it undoubtedly stands high in importance, and Henry, as its mainspring, appears among the most notable of English kings.

With the assistance of the Italian merchant-banker, Lodovico della Fava and the Italian banker, Girolamo Frescobaldi, Henry VII became deeply involved in the trade by licensing ships, obtaining alum from the Ottoman Empireand selling it to the Low Countries and in England.

The misconduct and rebellion of his sons, probably at the instigation of his queen, Eleanor of Aquitaine, are amply sufficient to account for some measure of bitterness and vindictiveness.

If this be an exaggerated view, it is nevertheless certain that Henry occupied a foremost position in Europe, and that England for the first time exerted an influence which was felt all over the Continent. With the English economy heavily invested in wool production, Henry VII became involved in the alum trade in However, Henry was threatened by several active rebellions over the next few years.

By the multiplication of a class of experts in finance and law Henry did much to establish two great professions, and the location of a permanent court at Westminster and the character of its business settled for England and for much of the English-speaking world that common law, not Roman law, would rule the courts and that London, and not an academy, would be its principal nursery.

It is not impossible, and has been recently suggested by L. Alison Weirhowever, points out that the Rennes ceremony, two years earlier, was possible only if Henry and his supporters were certain that the Princes were already dead.

He could be a good companion, with ready repartee in a jostling crowd, but he displayed at times the ungovernable temper of a furious animal and could be heartless and ruthless when necessary. Hugh of Lincoln, a saint whom the king himself had promoted to his bishopric.

The conquest of Ireland which Henry had projected in and for which he obtained a Bull from Pope Adrian IV was carried out later with the full sanction of Pope Alexander III, preserved to us in letters of unquestionable authenticity which concede in substance all that was granted by the disputed Bull of Adrian.

The Angevin Henry was not a hero or a patriot as we understand the terms nowadays, but he was, as Stubbs has said, "a far-seeing King who recognized that the well-being of the nation was the surest foundation of his own power". Henry also invested heavily in the construction and renovation of prestigious new royal buildings.

Two other practices developed by Henry became permanent.

Henry VII of England

It was thus, a few years later, that he came into conflict with the bishops, then led by Becket, over the alleged right of clerics to be tried for crime by an ecclesiastical court.

Trade agreements Henry VII was much enriched by trading alumwhich was used in the wool and cloth trades for use as a chemical dye fixative when dyeing fabrics. Some, indeed, were under the feudal overlordship of the king of France.Although the claim of his mother, Matilda, daughter of Henry I, to the English crown had been set aside by her cousin, King Stephen, Throughout his adult life Henry’s sexual morality was lax; but his relations with Eleanor, and to his grandson Henry II.

Ancestry and early life. Henry VII was born at Pembroke Castle on 28 Henry's protector fell ill and his principal advisers were more amenable to negotiating with the English king.

Henry was handed over and escorted to the Breton port of Saint-Malo. He therefore arranged a papal dispensation from Pope Julius II for Prince Henry to marry. His mother, Matilda, played an important role in his early life and exercised influence for many years later.

Henry's had major long-term consequences. His legal changes are generally considered to have laid the basis for English Common Law, with the Exchequer court a forerunner of the later Henry II appears as a character in several Successor: Richard I.

Henry II, King of England, b. ; ultimedescente.com 6, ; was in his earlier life commonly known as Henry Fitz-Empress from the fact that his mother Matilda, daughter of Henry I, was first married to the Emperor Henry V. Henry himself, however, was the son of her second husband, Geoffrey Plantagenet, and inherited from him the three important fiefs of Anjou, Touraine, and Maine.

Henry Ii Essay Examples. 8 total results. A History of the Conquest of Ireland by the English Empire under Henry II. 2, words. 4 pages. The Life of Henry II and His Influence of the English Exchequer. words. 2 pages. The Power Struggle Between the Church and State in. Henry II. From the Catholic Encyclopedia.

King of England, born ; died 6 July, ; was in his earlier life commonly known as Henry Fitz-Empress from the fact that his mother Matilda, daughter of Henry I, was first married to the Emperor Henry V.

Henry himself, however, was the son of her second husband, Geoffrey Plantagenet, and inherited from him the three important fiefs of Anjou.

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The life of henry ii and his influence of the english exchequer
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